Deleting Globally Installed npm Packages

The npm package manager can install packages in project directories or globally (i.e. in your /usr/local/bin/ directory). Fortunately, deleting a project removes all associated npm packages — since the packages are installed within the project directory. However, for globally installed packages, you’d first have to list them using: npm list -g –depth 0 This command to print to screen all top-level packages install using the npm install -g … command.
Read more →

Learning from the CIKM 2019 Reviews

Just this morning I received the reviews of my submission to the CIKM conference. My paper was rejected. With the hope that I can reduce future rejections, this post describes the lessons I’ve learned from the CIKM reviews. About the CIKM conference CIKM (ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management) is a competitive conference that is highly ranked by researchers and industry experts that specialise in machine learning, information retrieval, recommender systems and other topics related to knowledge management.
Read more →

VSCode Shell Commands not retaining install status in $PATH after restart

After you download VSCode and add it to your PATH, you may stumble upon a problem where you cannot launch VSCode from the command line or Terminal — it’s as if something modifies your system PATH and takes out the VSCode entry. This problem is notoriously annoying. But fret not, there’s a simple solution (for MacOS) users. Matan Gover responded to an GitHub issue related to the problem as follows:
Read more →

Vim bindings for Jupyter Lab cells: Installing the Extension

I’ve recently discovered the joy of Vim. And indeed, it does increase my coding speed (if that’s even a thing 🤔). Thanks to the jupyterlab-vim project, you can also get “:neckbeard: Vim notebook cell bindings for JupyterLab” To install this JupyterLab extension, activate the appropriate conda environment, then check if Node.js is installed conda list | grep node If you get an empty output, then it means that node isn’t installed.
Read more →

Comparing two Git branches

JTo see the differences between two branches in a Git reposiory, use: $ git diff branch_1 branch_2 If you already have a difftool setup (something like Kaleidoscope), you can view the DIFFs using: $ git difftool branch_1 branch_2 Both commands will produce the diff between the tips of the two branches. The same syntax works for comparing a branch with a tag or a tag with another tag. Note that you can also add a file or folder name after the above two commands.
Read more →